How to use the POEditor plugin for WordPress

With POEditor’s localization plugin for WordPress, you can manage your WordPress language files between POEditor and WP, from within your WP dashboard. Download and install the POEditor WordPress translation plugin according to the instructions in the Installation tab. Then follow this step by step guide to set up your localization workflow.

How to manage the WordPress localization workflow

Assign local language file to translation project - POEditor localization management platform

  • Step 1: Go to your POEditor account, click on your username in the navigation bar and then go to Account Settings > API Access. Generate an API token and copy it to the POEditor plugin in your WordPress account, where it says POEditor API KEY. A page will be generated, with all the software localization projects in your POEditor account (if you have any) and your local WordPress language files.
  • Step 2: Click on Create project in the POEditor plugin to start a new translation project. A corresponding project will be created in your account on the POEditor localization platform.
  • Step 3: Add a language in the POEditor plugin to the newly created project, and then link a WordPress language file to it by clicking on Assign file. 
  • Step 4: Press Export to send the terms from your local WordPress language file (.po or .pot) to your project on the POEditor software localization platform.

After you sent the terms from your local WordPress .po or .pot file to the POEditor localization platform, the translation process can begin. From the POEditor interface, you can assign contributors to each language to collaboratively translate the terms. Or you can make the translation project public on POEditor, so people can volunteer to translate the languages in your WordPress localization project.

If you want to add more languages to the translation project, repeat step 3. Don’t have a corresponding language file in your WordPress account to assign to the language you’ve added? You can use the POEditor plugin to create a new .po (and a matching .mo) file in the desired location.

If you use the POEditor localization platform instead of the plugin to add languages (or projects), just click on Refresh online projects list and they will appear in the POEditor WP plugin.

  • Step 5: Bring back to WordPress the localized languages from the POEditor localization platform. You can do this at any time, regardless of the translation’s progress. Just click in the POEditor plugin on Import (for individual languages) or Import all (to fetch all the linked languages in the translation project).

Following these simple steps, you can translate WordPress themes or plugins more efficiently.

What each button in the POEditor WP translation plugin does

To make everything crystal clear, below is a list of the buttons in the POEditor plugin. Each has a short descriptions of the actions it performs.

Change API Key: lets you change the API Key in the POEditor plugin, POEditor WordPress translation plugin - Main pagein case it was changed in the connected POEditor account.

Reset plugin: deletes all the local file assignments and detaches the WordPress installation from the POEditor accont.

Refresh online projects list: updates in the plugin the list of all the projects and languages in the connected POEditor account, along with their progress.

Assign file: links a language in a POEditor translation project to a local WordPress language file.

Import: brings to WordPress the .po and .mo files (containing both terms and translations) from the POEditor localization platform.

Export: sends the terms from the assigned WordPress language file to the corresponding POEditor localization project. Doesn’t touch the translations in the project.

Sync: sends the terms and the translations from the assigned WordPress language file to the corresponding language in the POEditor localization project. Also  overwrites the existing translations and deletes the obsolete terms.

Import all: brings the .po and .mo files for all the languages to WordPress, from the POEditor localization platform.

Add language to: creates a new language in the translation project on the POEditor localization platform.

Create project: creates a project in the connected POEditor account.

Rescan for language files: searches WordPress for .po and .pot language files.

Congratulations! You now know everything about POEditor’s translation plugin for WordPress. You should be able to effortlessly integrate the POEditor localization management platform into your workflow. Is anything you’d like to further discuss about the plugin? Just drop us a line in the comments or use the contact form.

 

How to use the Translation Memory

To make a localization process faster, there are aspects of it that can be automated. Translation is one of these aspects and even though it has been proven in numerous instances that machine translation cannot compare to human translation, there exists what is called Translation Memory, which combines the human touch with machine power to simplify the translator’s work.

How the POEditor Translation Memory works

Each time a user translates a term, the translation gets stored immediately in the TM database. The TM database stores one translation per user for each term, which gets updated each time the user edits it in the interface. In case different users add different translations for the same term, they all get stored in the Translation Memory database. If there is more than one translation variant for a term in the Translation Memory, the TM will generate a list of suggestion, so the users can select the most appropriate one. The TM will always list the translations according to how many times they were used.

How to use the Translation Memory with the POEditor localization platform

There are two ways in which translators can use the Translation Memory System: either in the language page, using the TM Suggestions, or by going to the Translation Memory page (look for the Translation Memory button in the side menu of the language page), where you can bulk load translations from the TM database.

Using Translation Memory Suggestions

For TM Suggestion to be displayed in the language pages of a POEditor localization project, they need to be activated in Account Settings by the project owner.

After switching on the TM suggestions, all the contributors will be able to see them under the empty translation fields, if any appropriate results are found in the database. Clicking the “Use” button next to a suggestion will copy it to the translation field.

Translation Memory Suggestions - POEditor Localization Platform

If the contributor has a Reference Language set, the Translation Memory will also search through the database for translations done in that language to propose TM suggestions.

Bulk loading translations from the Translation Memory database

Pressing the Translation Memory button in the side menu of the language page, you will be taken to the Translation Memory page. Press “Start searching”, and the system will start looking in the database for translations relevant to the untranslated terms. When it’s done, you will get a list with all the terms and the translations found in the TM database. You will be able to choose the variant that you find appropriate, if there are more than one, or to choose to completely ignore the translation(s) found for a particular term. By default, all the translations the TM finds are pre-selected, so you can easily load them in bulk in the language page by pressing “Use translations”.

POEditor localization platform - Translation Memory

Translation Memory Privacy

Each paid account has its own Translation Memory database. Because we take privacy seriously, you have to expressly grant your contributors or admins access to the Translation Memory, by going to Account Settings and switching Translation Memory Access to YES. Also, if you want people working on your software localization project to see the suggestions from the Translation Memory database, you will have to switch TM Suggestions to ON.

All the translations made for a localization project by a contributor belong both to the contributor and to the project owner, and are stored in both their Translation Memory databases, if they both have paid accounts.

How to set a payer for your POEditor account

Most of the time, the roles in a software localization workflow are very specialized, divided according to specific activities and tasks. Our experience with the localization industry has revealed that it’s not rare for companies to contact an agency to manage their software localization process. So they outsource it, but does the same apply for the payment for the localization services? Sometimes, even if a company does use an in-house localization team, the payment for the localization tools used in the translation process will still be managed by an Accounting Department. As you can see, the person with strings may not also be the one with the money.

So, to make sure the translation workflow suffers no disruption, we’ve come up with a payment management system that makes life easy for the person in charge of the financial aspect of the localization process.

Continue reading

How to use Webhooks to automate the sync with GitHub/Bitbucket

Lately, some users have been asking for a way to automate the synchronization between the POEditor localization platform and GitHub/Bitbucket repositories. Because we want to make them happy, we found a way to do this – webhooks. These “user-defined HTTP callbacks” can be used to trigger a certain sync in your repos. They can be called from anywhere, and can be maintained, modified and managed by any third-party users.

Preparing the webhook

To make use of a webhook, you first need to create a webhook URL. Find an example for GitHub here, and one for Bitbucket here.

After creating the webhook, you can add it to a GitHub or Bitbucket account so that events in the repos trigger terms (and translations) updates in a POEditor project.

Using webhooks with Bitbucket

To add a webhook to a Bitbucket account, just log on to it, go to Settings → Hooks, and select “POST” from the “Select a hook” dropdown menu. Then click on “Add hook” and introduce the webhook URL in the empty field. Whenever the repository changes, the webhook will be triggered to sync between the assigned language/project on POEditor and the file in the repo.

Using webhooks with Github

Adding a webhook to GitHub is also easy. Go to the account, click on Settings → Webhooks & Services → Add webhook, and add the webhook URL to the “Payload URL” field. Unlike in the case of Bitbucket webhooks, you can pick what kind of event(s) you want to trigger the webhook. It can be just the push event, individual events, or everything (any change in the repo).

So that’s that. The POEditor GitHub integration and Bitbucket integration are now faster than ever, because you have the choice to automatically send the updates in the repos to your localization projects managed on POEditor.

Update July 2015: It is now possible to use webhooks to export terms and translations from your POEditor localization project to your connected GitHub account. Please note that the export option can be triggered from anywhere, except GitHub.

How to show the source language accross all languages

App localization can get tricky at times, and one frequent reason for this is labels. Labels are alphanumeric identifiers and, as useful as they may be inside software, they are impossible to read by translators. They can be found in various file types, among which POEditor supports Windows .resx & .resw, iOS .strings, Java .properties and Gettext .po files. In a language page, terms consisting in labels look like this:
POEditor localization managent platform - Labels (Language Page)As a “decrypting” solution for this comes the almighty Reference Language feature. A Reference Language helps contributors with their translation work by letting them see, above each original term (which is a label), a term in another language existing in the project.

How to set a (Default) Reference Language for a Localization ProjectPOEditor localization management platform - Set Default Reference Language

First of all, after creating the project, a project owner (or an administrator) needs to create a language that corresponds to one that’s already in the user’s software. Then it’s time to import into the project both the terms (labels) and the translations in the created language. The project owner or the administrator can set a Default Reference Language for everyone from Project Settings > Edit Project Details, or they can grant contributors with Read Access to All Languages so they can choose their own Reference Language (which will override de Default Reference Language, if one is set).

As previously mentioned, contributors can set their own Reference Language. POEditor localization management platform - Set Reference LangaugeOnce they have Read Access to All Languages, all they need to do is to click in the language page on the Set Reference Language button in the right-hand Options Menu and pick their preferred language from the project.

In the end, after choosing a Reference Language or a Default Reference POEditor localization management platform - Language page (with Reference Language)Language, language pages will show the terms something like in this picture on the right.
As a final observation, note that you should be careful with the Automatic Translation feature while working on projects containing labels. You will want to make sure that you select as source language anything but the project terms. There you have it! Now that you know about Reference Language, translating apps with POEditor should be as easy as pie!

How to use tags in your localization projects

Today we will show you how easy it is to use POEditor’s tagging system among your localization projects. Tags are a simple solution for organizing terms, and they come in handy both during translation and on export. Some situations in which you would care to make use of tags would be:

  • When you want to manage localization projects with similar translations in the same POEditor translation project.
  • When translating terms from several platforms within the same project. With tags, you can keep track of each platform’s set of terms so you can export them accordingly when the translations are ready.
  • When having different versions of the same terms within a project. Tags will help you follow each version, to translate them selectively and export them as such.

How to set tags in POEditor

There are two ways in which you can tag terms in a localization project:

  • Import FileOn import
    While on a project page, go to Import Terms > Advanced Options. After selecting a language file, you can add tags for the terms to be imported. You can add tags to all the terms in the file, to the new terms (which are in the file to be imported and not in the project), or to the obsolete ones (which are in the project but not in the file to be imported).

  • Add tags in View TermsDuring translation
    While on a project page, go to View or Add terms and select the terms you want to tag by checking the boxes on their left. In the dropdown menu at the bottom of the page, choose Add Tags to Selection and write the name of the tag in the box next to the menu. You can use an already existing tag or add a new one.

Filtering by tags

Again, two situations:

  • Filter by tagsDuring translation
    To clearly view all the terms in a certain category on a language page, just select the desired tag from the top left drop-down menu and have your set of terms exclusively displayed.

  • Export by tagsOn export
    While on a language page, click on Export > Advanced Options and select the filters you want to apply for export. The result will be a file containing only the pairs of terms and translations which have been tagged with the selected tag(s).

We have seen tags used in many creative ways by our users, so by no means should you limit yourselves to the examples given in this article. Whether you want to sort your terms by date, platform or anything else, using tags will help you neatly organize your sets of terms for a smooth localization process.

Update February 2015: On import, if you choose to overwrite the translations, you now have available the option of tagging the terms which have had their translations modified.