POEditor product updates: spring 2021

Our team has been keeping busy this past season – as per usual ūüėä – to make your translation and localization management experience better with our software. We’ve been working on various POEditor product updates, some more user-facing than others. Below, we’ve put together a list of some things we’ve removed from our backlog, among the most highly-requested.

New login options

Among the latest POEditor product updates are also support for two-factor authentication and email login. 2FA sets an extra layer of security on your account, by asking for a code when you log in, which is generated by an Authentication App set up priory by you on one of your devices. Email login allows you to sign in to your account with your email address and a one-time sign in code you receive on email, so you won’t need to use a password.

POEditor localization platform login options

QA Checks module enhanced

Previously available in the form of real-time translation notifications, the QA Checks module has been improved in two ways. On the one side, the QA checks list has grown to encapsulate more errors. On the other, you can now filter the translations with detected errors from the ones without. Consequently, this will speed up the process of fixing any mismatches between the source and target strings.

An example of errors found by POEditor's QA Checks module
Errors found by the QA Checks module

If you’re interested to learn more about the available options to sign in to our localization management platform, you can find a full list here.

ICU for plural rules

As of recently, POEditor also understands ICU message syntax for plural rules. If a string in your source language contains plural-specific ICU message syntax, our localization platform will detect it. On this occasion, you will see an eye icon at the bottom right corner of any translation box in the translation editor. Clicking on this eye icon will open an ICU Editor, where you can specify translations for each plural form.

ICU syntax detected by POEditor’s online translation editor

Export empty translations option for API

Mirroring the option already existent in the user interface, the Export empty translations option is now also available with the API. To change this localization project setting via API, you can use the method projects_update with the argument fallback_language. The value of the fallback_language should be the code of the language from which you want to export empty translations.

TextMaster integration is back

Finally, we’re happy to let you know the integration with the language service provider TextMaster is once again available. So, when you order translations, you can now choose between two providers. Both Gengo and TextMaster offer two pricing tiers, each recommended for particular translation needs. The language pairs offered by Gengo are listed here and the ones offered by TextMaster are listed here.

Quotes received for selected language pair

If there are particular POEditor product updates you’d like to see in the future, we’d love to hear about them! The best way to contact us is on email, at info@poeditor.com – and we’ll get right back to you!

Top POEditor features you may not be using (yet) in your localization project

Whether you are interested in mobile app localization or you want to translate website strings, POEditor is surely one of the best translation management systems for the job.

One main point of difference for our translation and localization management system is that the user interface is uncluttered. Along the years, we’ve been stubborn to keep our UI easy to use for everyone, especially newbies. This meant making obvious only the most essential tools for translation and localization management, while keeping other powerful, more specialized tools on the discrete side.

Here we list a few of our top features that you may or may not be using in your localization project. If you’re not using them, we encourage you to give them a go. We’ve heard they make a great difference.

Tags

We built the Tagging System to help you keep strings grouped in your localization project.

Since we don’t store the files you use on import, but parse them to get the language data and store that only in our database, it’s important to know which strings came from where, in case you’re working with multiple source files.

Tags work perfectly for this case when you use them on import. But you can use them as custom filters too, and also mark your terms with tags in the interface, after import.

Tagging terms when importing them to the localization project
Tagging terms when importing them to the localization project

The best thing about tags? They are supported by the API and by the integrations with GitHub, Bitbucket, GitLab and Azure DevOps.

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POEditor design changes: what’s new

Every now and then, redesigns need to happen. It’s never an easy job, because you want to please everyone. However, with a clear head and a tight-knit team, you can put together the feedback you received from your users and the best UX practices and come up with a better product.

For those who already know the POEditor localization platform for a while, we’ve put together this blog post to present the main design changes. Rest assured that they’re not that big.

Options Menu moves to the top

For easier navigation, the Options Menu in the Project Page was moved to the top of the work space.

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Continuous localization with GitHub and POEditor

Why continuous localization

In today’s digital world, more and more software is becoming alive. This is due to a shift in the software industry from a linear approach to software development to an agile approach. Apps and websites are updated all the time, in small chunks, instead of being built in long development cycles, culminating with big releases. Thus, when the software product is launched, it is no longer the end of the development process for it, but the beginning. 

Naturally, if you are continuously developing your multilingual software product, you should also continuously localize it. You don’t want to leave behind any of your users when you roll out new features. Nor do you want to look unprofessional, by not localizing parts of your software in certain languages. So it’s a good idea to aim for a continuous approach on localization.

What is POEditor

POEditor is an online localization service and translation management system, designed to help all parties involved in the localization process on their quest to achieve a continuous workflow.

As a freemium SaaS, POEditor offers free and paid accounts and supports free of charge the localization of open source software with an OSI-approved license.

If you use a translation and localization management service like POEditor, you’re likely to see better collaboration between team members, an increase in automation and productivity, and more streamlined workflows all around.

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Improved POEditor webhooks

We have recently changed the way webhoooks work with POEditor in order to improve security. On March the 1st, 2019, we will discontinue the former webhooks format. This is just a change in the format of the webhooks, the functionality remains the same, as described below.

How webhooks work

Webhooks work in the same way for all the code hosting services supported by POEditor: GitHub, Bitbucket, GitLab or Visual Studio Teams Service – VSTS. They can be called from anywhere, and can be maintained, modified and managed by any third-party users. In your account, you can access the webhooks page via the Add/Manage webhooks link in the bottom right corner of the integration page.

POEditor GitHub Integration Page
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Translation options with the localization platform POEditor

According to the nature of your project and the localization resources you have available, you can choose to translate strings with POEditor using one or a combination of the translation options.

Keep on reading to find out more about them, so you can make an informed decision on what to choose for the translation projects you’re managing with our localization platform.

Assigning contributors to specific languages

Whether your company has its own translation department, you collaborate with a translation agency or you have some friends willing to help with the translation, this option is for you. You know exactly who will be translating the project into what language.

Add contributor - POEditor localization management platform
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Free localization with the POEditor translation platform

The online localization platform POEditor is free to use to translate software projects collaboratively in the following circumstances:

With Free Accounts

If you register to the POEditor, you get an account with a Free plan by default. The free account can accomodate software localization projects summing up to 1000 strings, which is usually enough to translate a small app or a WordPress theme into a few languages.

Also, you can use your free account to contribute without any limitation to localization projects owned by other users. The strings you translate for others are counted against their account.

Free plans, like all the other POEditor plans, can host¬†an unlimited number of¬†projects, languages and contributors. But, unlike accounts with paid plans, free accounts don’t come with a Translation Memory feature.
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How the Realtime Translation System helps l10n teams

At POEditor, we are dedicated to bringing you the best interface where you can manage your collaborative translation work. We know it is essential for any localization project manager or translator to stay updated with their team’s whereabouts and actions, in order to maintain a smooth and natural workflow. So, to avoid stepping on each other’s toes, we’ve built POEditor with a Realtime Translation System.

The POEditor Realtime Translation System is good for all POEditor users, regardless of their role in a project. First of all, it is useful for contributors, because they can see who is active on the same language as they are, at the same moment. It also shows them in real time if a translation is added, edited or deleted for a term in that language. If there is more than one person translating on the same page, the system will mark the translation fields that are being worked on by coloring their borders. If two or more contributors are on a translation field at the same time, a bubble will inform them who else is translating that term.

POEditor localization tool - Realtime Translation System
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POEditor has a new Translation Memory Engine

esp_03Here at POEditor, we’re always trying to optimize and improve performance. For this reason, in the past few weeks, we’ve been really busy reconstructing our Translation Memory engine.

Given the growth rate of POEditor and the number of strings in large accounts, we¬†began noticing¬†some delay in the¬†TM for suggested translations, especially when the system searched for translations of small strings (such as “Account” or “Cancel”). Some tests and debugging quickly pointed us¬†to¬†the database queries, which had become¬†slower as the database increased.

We then took a radical decision, to move all the TM related searches to a dedicated search engine. After lots of research and tests, we choose Elasticsearch, which is based on the powerful Apache Lucene project. Elasticsearch is a flexible and powerful open source, distributed, real-time search and analytics engine, running on Java.

To cut the technical stuff short, the performance improved by a factor of more than 10 times in some cases and it’s expected that the future growth won’t affect the system performance as it did before this.

We would like to see you test the limits of the Translation Memory engine, with countless translations from old and new localization projects. You will surely be compelled by how this powerful piece of software enhances the automated part of the POEditor experience!